Canceled – Basic Western Style Engraving

Basic Western Style Engraving

June 1-5, 2020

Cost $300

Class is limited to 10 students

Continuing education only, not for college credit

To register Call Donna Haddow at 719 846-5724 or donna.haddow@trinidadstate.edu

Introduction and overview

Tools used

Types of gravers and how to sharpen them

  • Design Layout
  • Basic scroll design
  • Basic design layout
  • Do’s and don’ts of design layout
  • Getting started
  • Basic cuts
  • Putting cuts together
  • Practice practice practice
  • Tips & Tricks
  •  Layout tips
  • Transfer tips and tricks
  • Books & CD resources
  • Online resources (YouTube and others)
  • More practice
  • More advanced techniques if time permits

About the instructor:

Rex Crawford

Rex Crawford grew up working on horse and cattle ranches in Oklahoma, Texas, and New Mexico so he understands the important balance between functionality and aesthetics of cowboy gear.  He has been making custom spurs since 2000 expanding to custom saddle silver, belt buckles, jewelry, and just about anything a customer can dream up.  He studied the art of bright cut engraving under Diane Scalese at the GRS engraving school in Emporia, Kansas and has continued to improve his skills through additional GRS courses as well as a Traditional Cowboy Arts Association (TCAA) workshop. In 2015, Rex was honored by the Academy of Western Artists as the Engraver of the Year.

Required tools and supplies

18-10 Straight liner

14-6 Straight Liner

QC-42 Flat Graver or QC-45 Flat Graver

QC-37 Flat Graver

Glensteel V Point 120 degree

Glensteel V Point 105 degree

QC handle of your choice

Chinese White (pigment)

Traditional QC 10 pack

Dividers

Scribe

Optivisor #3

Pencil and sketch pad of your choice

The above tools are available from GRS engraving tools (Glendo Corp.)  Please contact Aaron McMichael at (800) 835-3519 or amcmichael@glendo.com.  Aaron will put together a package deal of all of the above supplies and materials needed (except the sketch pad and pencil).

Canceled – Conserving Vintage Firearms

Conserving Vintage Firearms: Lock, Stock, and Barrel
June 22 – 26, 2020, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

$400

To sign up or for more information contact Donna Haddow at 719-846-5724 or donna.haddow@trinidadstate.edu
(Continuing ed only, not for college credit)

Students will be introduced to the primary mainstream infantry rifles common during the 100+ year “glory” of the British Empire, including:
the “Brown Bess”, a .70 caliber flint-lock, black powder (“BP”), smooth-bore, muzzle loader (circa 1800); the Enfield Pattern 53 (“P53”), a .577 caliber percussion cap, BP, rifled muzzle loader (circa 1856); the Snider-Enfield cartridge conversion of the P53 (circa 1862); the Martini-Henry, a .577/450, BP, necked cartridge, lever action (circa 1877); and the Lee-Enfield, a .303 caliber, BP or smokeless powder, necked cartridge, bolt-action (circa 1889).
Note 2: the only primary Empire infantry rifle I lack is the Baker Rifle – if someone has one, PLEASE BRING IT!
Note 3: I consider the Brunswick (circa 1837) to be a transition model between the successful Bess-type flint-locks and the excellent P53 percussion cap; although produced for more than 50 years, I am not aware of its use in any significant combat arena. Again, if you have one, please bring it to share with the class.
Caveat Emptor: Many thousands of “Kyber Pass” copies of the Bess, the Brunswick and P53 models were fabricated, and many are still being marketed as originals. Fortunately, careful research and examination can usually distinguish the clones from the originals.
For some of these models, I have carbine versions issued to mounted troops, and, sometimes, artillerists. If time allows, I may present additional 19-Century military firearms, e.g., the Springfield Trap-door (Model 1873), the Werndl, a strange Austrian design (circa 1870), the revolutionary French 8mm Lebel (circa 1886), and the fantastic Mauser Gewehr 98 (circa 1889).
We will fully disassemble each of these, and discuss techniques for detecting problems in each of the mechanical components. To the extent possible, I will describe techniques and sources for returning many of these components to functional condition. However, great care MUST be taken if you decide to actually fire a truly vintage firearm. I will discuss techniques for doing so, with the primary goal of protecting YOU from possible injury, but also to minimize the risk that the gun will incur irreparable damage or possible destruction.
Since the wooden stocks of many current examples of these fine weapons have been “refinished” using modern coatings, e.g., varnish or (Heaven forbid!) polyurethane, I will demonstrate my preferred techniques for removing these inappropriate finishes and restoring the original RAW Linseed Oil finish.


I will NOT demonstrate any blueing or browning techniques as I deem this action to be beyond the legitimate scope of “conservation. “


Prerequisites: Knowledge of basic rules of firearm safety. Basic skills employing standard hand tools useful in disassembling and reassembling firearms. Although not required, I encourage all students to bring at least one firearm older than 75 years, and, frankly, the older the better! WWII specimens will be acceptable, but WWI or older would be more appropriate.

Jeffrey Van Myers

About the Instructor: Jeffrey Van Myers hails from the Brush Country of Deep South Texas. In 1954, at the ripe old age of 8, he received, as a gift from a family friend, his first “vintage” firearm – an original 1894 Stevens Favorite .22 rifle; the barrel is still shot out and the unique “7 o’clock ejector” is still missing, but he still has it in his collection. His love of these old classics dates from this very special event. Over the course of the intervening years, he has collected, and conserved, many more of these “Old Ladies”. In part due to his 50+-year study of war, warfare and warriors, he has focused primarily on military firearms, and, in particular, on the amazing series of infantry rifles designed especially for use by the foot soldiers of the British Empire. However, he has also collected and conserved specimens of the primary infantry rifles used by all of the major participants in the Great War (WWI), except for the Russian Nagant. One of his prize possessions is a Japanese Arisaka Type 99, that he suspects was a “carry-back” from the battle for Guadalcanal in 1942. Although still an active Patent Attorney, Jeffrey owns and operates the Armeria del Sur, Driftwood, TX, and its international partner, Armeria del Sur, in Costa Rica. He is a Viet Nam veteran, holds both an FFL and an FEL, and has been attending summer classes at Trinidad since 2015.


Tools:
(Please keep in mind that the tools suggested for each class are the minimum tools you should bring. Please feel free to bring any additional tools you feel you may need)
Basic hand tools, preferably of smith quality, especially the screwdrivers and drift punches (I use and recommend both Grace and Wheeler Engineering). If you bring something special to share with the class and you happen to have any unique tools for your “old friend”, please bring them as I may not have what we need to fully disassemble it.
Supplies:
—RAW (not “boiled”) linseed oil, approximately 1 qt. per project; this is rarely sold in normal hardware/lumber stores, so I special order it on-line; “Sunnyside” brand is what I use:
http://www.sunnysidecorp.com/product.php?p=cf&b=s&n=873G5
—Minwax Antique Furniture Refinisher, approximately 1 qt. per project – should be easy to get at your local Home Depot:
http://www.minwax.com/wood-products/preparation/minwax-antique-furniture-refinisher
—Mineral spirits – approximately 1 qt per project – may be furnished by the school.
—Ballistol – 4 oz bottle of liquid – I am a dealer and may be able to obtain samples for each student.
—Froglube – 4 oz paste – I am a dealer and may be able to obtain samples for each student:
http://shop.froglube.com/FrogLube-CLP-Paste-4-oz-Jar-FLP-P412.htm
—Steel wool #0000 – 1 pkg, available at most hardware/lumber stores.
—Wet/dry sandpaper 220 and 400 grit; available in the Trinidad campus book store.
—Nitrile (or equivalent) gloves – 1 pkg (we will go through these pretty quickly, depending on the condition of the wood components).
—A US nickel – this, plus the Froglube, does an amazing job of removing surface rust!
Optional:

  1. Given the difficulty of finding ammo for these really old guns, I am prepared to teach the class how to cast bullets and then re-size to correct diameter, provided that we have access to the bluing room during this portion of the class.
  2. I may also have time to teach how to make a pretty good bullet lube from the following:
    —Paraffin wax, unscented – 16 oz will make a nice batch; available in most grocery stores, e.g., Walmart.
    —Moly-fortified wheel bearing grease – 1 lb can; I like the Valvoline:
    https://www.valvoline.com/our-products/grease-gear-oil/moly-fortified-multi-purpose-grease
    —Lard – 1 lb box, available at most grocery stores.
    —Muffin tin – makes convenient sized “pucks” when allowed to cool and harden.
    —Cookie pan/sheet (needs a rim around all 4 sides) – used to immerse the lube groove(s) of a
    batch of cast bullets, base down, in liquefied lube; when cooled and hardened, the bullets can be
    extracted with the lube grooves full of the lube mix; something like this (but does not need to be
    non-stick):
    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Wilton-Bake-It-Better-10-x-15-Cookie-Sheet/25420423
http://trinidadstate.edu/gunsmithing/nra_courses.html

Canceled – Relief Printmaking

Dates:  February 10-14, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. each day

Cost: $230 includes materials

Call Donna Haddow to sign up: 719-846-5724  or donna.haddow@trinidadstate.edu

Location:  Berg 401 M-Th with a trip to the instructor’s studio on the last day

This workshop will offer an introduction to the wonderful tools and techniques of the age-old art of block printing. The workshop will teach basic relief printing techniques including creating an image, cutting the image into a block and creating prints with a hand printing technique. Students will work together and receive one-on-one input from the instructor throughout the workshop. Participants will further their understanding of reductive methods in printmaking, and in ways to plan relief images to maximize their success. Their appreciation and understanding of the value of creating artwork will be deepened, and they will come away with prints of their own, and also perhaps, of each others work.

Amanda Palmer

Instructor Amanda Palmer holds a Bachelor of Arts in Art with an emphasis Printmaking from San Francisco State University in San Franscisco, California. Her studies also included art history, sculpture, visual arts, environmental art, American Indian Studies. She completed an internship in the Art Department of Mother Jones Magazine and an internship in etching and lithography with Hines Editions, Limestone Press in San Francisco.  Amanda is the owner of Tabula Rasa Studio in Trinidad, Colorado.  https://wanderartist.com/ 

Canceled – Knifemaking

Knifemaking – Basic Stock Removal

June 1-5, 2020

 $350

Continuing Ed only-not for college credit

To register call Donna Haddow at 719 846-5724.

This basic Knifemaking course will cover knife design, handle materials, soldering, steels, heat treatment, polishing, and sharpening.  One knife and sheath will be made in the class. 

Steve Rollert has been making knives for over 40 years, starting with a Burr King grinder in the spare bedroom of a duplex in Denver, Colorado in 1980. Steve’s interest in knifemaking started while attending Skunk Hollow Blacksmithing School. After graduation Steve sought out Japanese Swordsmith, Kuzan Oda, then in Colorado Springs. Kuzan taught Steve the Japanese mindset and disciplines of knifemaking necessary to produce knives of enduring quality and value.Steve has progressed to producing Damascus Steel and hand forging fine blades in his large shop in Keenesburg, CO. He is well known for his quality pattern welded Damascus and his earlier work in cable welded Damascus.  In 1999 Steve started Keen Edge Knives in response to a number of requests for high quality training knives from his fellow martial artists. Over the years Steve has strived to provide the best quality product possible at a reasonable price. 

Tool list

(Please keep in mind that the tools suggested for each class are the minimum tools you should bring.  Please feel free to bring any additional tools you feel you may need)

 Safety glasses

 Respirator either dust mask or double filter (preferred)

 Work apron

 Baseball or other brimmed hat

 Hearing protection

 Welding gloves

 Grinding belts 2 each in 36-40, 60, 220, 400 grit, zircon or ceramic recommended but aluminum oxide is acceptable, but will not wear as long, size: 2 inch by 72 inch in length.

Please bring a refillable water bottle since we will be working around hot forges and in June weather.

Canceled – Basic Bladesmithing

June 8-12, 2020

$400

Continuing Education only – not for college credit

To register call Donna Haddow at 719 846-5724.

This class will cover the forging and grinding of both full and hidden tang blades to shape. We will cover steel selection, tool considerations, different forging approaches, several heat treating techniques, and basic finishing techniques.

Steve Rollert

Steve Rollert has been making knives for over 40 years, starting with a Burr King grinder in the spare bedroom of a duplex in Denver, Colorado in 1980. Steve’s interest in knifemaking started while attending Skunk Hollow Blacksmithing School. After graduation Steve sought out Japanese Swordsmith, Kuzan Oda, then in Colorado Springs. Kuzan taught Steve the Japanese mindset and disciplines of knifemaking necessary to produce knives of enduring quality and value.Steve has progressed to producing Damascus Steel and hand forging fine blades in his large shop in Keenesburg, CO. He is well known for his quality pattern welded Damascus and his earlier work in cable welded Damascus.  In 1999 Steve started Keen Edge Knives in response to a number of requests for high quality training knives from his fellow martial artists. Over the years Steve has strived to provide the best quality product possible at a reasonable price. 

Tool list

(Please keep in mind that the tools suggested for each class are the minimum tools you should bring.  Please feel free to bring any additional tools you feel you may need)

 Safety glasses

 Respirator either dust mask or double filter (preferred)

 Work apron

 Baseball or other brimmed hat

 Hearing protection

 Welding gloves

 One pair large vice grips

 Hammers – cross pein, and ball pein of about 1.5 to 2.5 pound in weight

 Grinding belts 2 each in 60, 220, 400 grit, zircon or ceramic recommended but aluminum oxide is acceptable, but will not wear as long, size: 2 inch by 72 inch in length.

Please bring a refillable water bottle since we will be working around hot forges and in June weather. Steel is provided by the instructor for a fee payable at the time of the class.

Red hot Damascus billet

Canceled – Damascus Billet Making

Damascus Billet Making

June 15-19, 2020

$400

Continuing education only – not for college credit

To register call Donna Haddow at 719 846-5724.

This class is a hands on class for the students. This class will be focused on the making of Damascus (pattern welded) steel for use in gun hardware and knife blades. Each student should finish the class with at least one billet of Damascus steel to take home.

Kinfe made from Damascus steel
Damascus still knife

This focus of this class is to teach “dry welding” technique, that is the making of Damascus steel using no flux. This approach provides steel of much greater consistency and strength. We will be using gas forges to weld our steel not coal. Subjects covered will include: Dry vs. Wet forge welding, steel selection, tool selection, use of power equipment such as power hammers and forging presses, pattern development, heat treating and etching. Steve Rollert has been making knives for over 40 years, starting with a Burr King grinder in the spare bedroom of a duplex in Denver, Colorado in 1980. Steve’s interest in knifemaking started while attending Skunk Hollow Blacksmithing School. After graduation Steve sought out Japanese Swordsmith, Kuzan Oda, then in Colorado Springs. Kuzan taught Steve the Japanese mindset and disciplines of knifemaking necessary to produce knives of enduring quality and value.Steve has progressed to producing Damascus Steel and hand forging fine blades in his large shop in Keenesburg, CO. He is well known for his quality pattern welded Damascus and his earlier work in cable welded Damascus.  In 1999 Steve started Keen Edge Knives in response to a number of requests for high quality training knives from his fellow martial artists. Over the years Steve has strived to provide the best quality product possible at a reasonable price. 

Tool list

(Please keep in mind that the tools suggested for each class are the minimum tools you should bring.  Please feel free to bring any additional tools you feel you may need)

Students will pay the instructor $30 per billet for the raw steel at the time of the class

 Safety glasses

 Respirator either dust mask or double filter (preferred)

 Work apron

 Baseball or other brimmed hat

 Hearing protection

 Welding gloves

 One pair large vice grips

 Hammers – cross pein and ball pein of about 1.5 to 2.5 pound in weight

 Grinding belts – 2 each in 36-40, 60, 220, 400 grit – Zircon or ceramic recommended but aluminum oxide is acceptable but will not wear as long, size: 2 inch by 72 inch in length

Please bring a refillable water bottle since we will be working around hot forges in June    

Canceled – Hatmaking and Hat Repair (Trinidad)

Hat Making and Hat Repair

June 22-26, 2020

$325

TO REGISTER CALL DONNA AT 719 846-5724

(Continuing ed only, not for college credit)

Students will learn to use the equipment and techniques to make a hat with products that most people have or can readily get from home.  Students will learn how to shape the hat by hand, ironing of the brim, sizing and hand cutting of the brim, hand pouncing and hand finishing the crown.  Students will leave with one completed, new hat. 

In addition, students will learn hat binding and how to trim by hand.  They will learn to refurbish old hats and are encouraged to bring a couple of old, dirty hats to renovate/revive.  Students will learn skills such as pencil curls, hole repair, and turning a hat inside out.

Tom Hirt is old-fashioned guy who does things the old fashioned way.  You might call him a throw-back to a bygone era-that time when h and cowboys and craftsmen took care of business with their hands.  Hirt continues that tradition to this day as a hat maker who makes superior-quality beaver felt hats one at a time by hand.  Known as the hat maker for the movies, he has designed hats for many famous clients including Val Kilmer, Sam Elliot, and Sharon Stone.  His credits include Tombstone, the Quick and the Dead, Conagher, and many others.  After almost 20 years, he is considered one of the West’s most notable and most established hatters. 

Tom Hirt shapes a hat
Instructor Tom Hirt shapes a hat

 

Tom will provide a hat box with all the tools and materials needed for each student.  A separate materials fee will be due to Tom at the time of class.  Please contact Tom in advance at 719-372-9399 to discuss your projects and needs so he will come prepared to help you complete your projects and can give you an estimated cost of materials you may need to purchase from him. 

Hat made in the Hatmaking Class

Hatmaking – This class is full

HAT MAKING with Tom Hirt

July 20-24, 2020

 $325 (does not include the cost of materials)

Continuing Ed only-not for college credit

 $325 (extra charge for each hat)

To register call Donna Haddow at 719 846-5724.

Making a hat
Making a hat

Continuing Education only-not for college credit

PLEASE NOTE

FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER, THIS CLASS WILL BE HELD AT THE A.R. MITCHELL MUSEUM OF WESTERN ART, 150 E. MAIN STREET,  TRINIDAD, CO 81082

Students will learn to use the equipment and techniques to make a hat with products that most people have or can readily get from home.  Students will learn how to shape the hat by hand, ironing of the brim, sizing and hand cutting of the brim, hand pouncing and hand finishing the crown. If time allows, the class may touch on hat binding and trim by hand.  Students will leave class with a completed hat and the skills needed to practice what they learned at home and make additional hats with supplies they have on hand.  Tom will provide a hat box with all the tools and materials needed for each student.  This class has some down time while waiting for processes to complete.  To fill this time, students may bring a hat in need of repair and/or plan to make a second hat as time permits.

Tom Hirt is old-fashioned guy who does things the old fashioned way.  You might call him a throw-back to a bygone era – when cowboys and craftsmen took care of business with their hands.  Hirt continues that tradition to this day as a hat maker who makes superior-quality beaver felt hats one at a time by hand.  Known as the hat maker for the movies, he has designed hats for many famous clients including Val Kilmer, Sam Elliot, and Sharon Stone.  His movie credits include Tombstone, the Quick and the Dead, Conagher, and many others.  After many decades, he is considered one of the West’s most notable and most established hatters. 

Three students with their completed hats

  

Tool/Supply list

Students will need to register no later than June 15th in order for Tom to get the materials he will need for the class. Hats of the West or email Tom at info@tomhirt.com  719-372-9399. Students should contact Tom at the number above to get a complete list of other supplies [at students expense] they need to bring and provide their hat size for ordering the block, etc.  Students will reimburse Tom for the cost of supplies and should contact him for pricing and to provide hat size information.

Holster from leather class

Canceled – Leather Holster Making

Leather Holster Making 

June 15-19, 2020

$350

To register call Donna Haddow at 719 846-5724.

Does not include leather, which you will need to purchase when you arrive

Continuing Ed Only – not for college credit

This class was created to teach students how to construct quality gun leather using methods and techniques requiring a minimum number of leather tools.  Since the work is by hand (no sewing machines, etc.) reasonable hand strength and dexterity is necessary for class participation.

Students will learn the methods I used to design, layout, stitch, wet mold, edge, burnish, apply oil or antique finish, and basket stamp holsters.  As the class progresses, each student will construct two holsters for guns of their choice.  I would suggest a pancake holster for a semi auto (model 1911’s are great) as well as a revolver holster of either a conventional or western design.  You will have the opportunity to basket stamp one of these holsters if you so desire.  Students may wish to bring two personal handguns to use in constructing these holsters (no scoped handguns, please).  If time permits, we will discuss construction of gun belts, cartridge loop sewing, magazine cases, saddle scabbards, and knife sheaths.

Robert (Bob) Calkins is an active shooter, hunter and firearms collector who has made gun leather for himself, friends, and customers for over 50 years.  In 1990, he and his wife, LaVon, decided to establish 3 Cross Custom Gunleather as a part-time business.  Upon retiring from the Department of the Interior in 1994, gun leather became a full-time occupation.  Bob crafts gun rigs for cowboy competitors, which has included State, National, and World Champion shooters.  Hunters, outdoorsmen, casual shooters, and concealed-carry holders, make up the balance of his business.

At age 75, Bob has cut back on working hours, but still produces several holsters and gun belts every week.  In his opinion, there are numerous good leather craftsmen.  However, he believes an individual with a true appreciation of firearms and their use is essential to building a truly functional piece of gun leather.

Bob Calkins   505-598-0208 (home), 505-716-3231 (cell)  or three.cross@hotmail.com

Bob Calkins
Bob Calkins

  Bob Calkins

Leather Holster Making Tool List

Quality leather will be made available to students through the college bookstore.  Costs will be based on projects to be developed.  Students will go to the bookstore as a group at the beginning of class in order to pay for their share of the leather. 

Needles, thread, oil, stamping tools, etc. will be furnished at no charge by the instructor. 

(Please keep in mind that the tools suggested for each class are the minimum tools you should bring.  Please feel free to bring any additional tools you feel you may need)

  • ¼” light weight electric drill
  • Dremel tool with sanding drums
  • Clear safety glasses
  • Sponge and quart size water container (large butter tub is great)
  • Straight edge ruler
  • 16: x 20” piece of ¾” plywood with smooth side
  • Exacto knife with blades
  • Rawhide #4 Mallet (such as Tandy #3300-04)
  • Craft Tool Leather Shears (such as Tandy #3050-00)
  • Grooving tool (such as Tandy 8074-00)
  • Edging tool (such as Tandy #8077-03 or Osborne #127-4 preferred)
  • Craft tool Overstitcher #6 (such as Tandy 8079-06)
  • #14 Punch (such as Tandy 3777-14)
  • #9 Punch (such as Tandy 3777-9)
  • 12” x 12” Granite piece (minimum 1” thick)
leather rifle scabbard

Canceled – Gun Leather II and Cowboy Leather

Gun Leather II and Western and Cowboy Leather

June 22-26, 2020

$350

To register call Donna Haddow at 719 846-5724.

Does not include leather, which you will need to purchase when you arrive

Continuing Ed only – not for college credit

Gun leather II was created to expand methods and techniques learned by students in Basic Holster making.  The course will take students to the next level of gun leather construction and will include an emphasis on Western and Cowboy leather techniques.  Students will review principles learned in Basic Holster making with emphasis on development of a gun belt, holster, and associated leather for a complete gun rig.  The remainder of the class will give students the latitude to develop projects of their choice associated with guns, knives, and cartridge retention.  Students will be required to provide their own firearms and knives for project development.

Robert (Bob) Calkins is an active shooter, hunter and firearms collector who has made gun leather for himself, friends, and customers for over 50 years.  In 1990, he and his wife, LaVon, decided to establish 3 Cross Custom Gunleather as a part-time business.  Upon retiring from the Department of the Interior in 1994, gun leather became a full-time occupation.  Bob crafts gun rigs for cowboy competitors, which has included State, National, and World Champion shooters.  Hunters, outdoorsmen, casual shooters, and concealed-carry holders, make up the balance of his business.

At age 75, Bob has cut back on working hours, but still produces several holsters and gun belts every week.  In his opinion, there are numerous good leather craftsmen.  However, he believes an individual with a true appreciation of firearms and their use is essential to building a truly functional piece of gun leather.

Bob Calkins   505-598-0208 (home), 505-716-3231 (cell)  or three.cross@hotmail.com

Bob Calkins
Bob Calkins

  

Gun Leather Tool List

Quality leather will be made available to students through the college bookstore.  Costs will be based on projects to be developed.  Students will go to the bookstore as a group at the beginning of class in order to pay for their share of the leather. 

Needles, thread, oil, stamping tools, etc. will be furnished at no charge by the instructor. 

(Please keep in mind that the tools suggested for each class are the minimum tools you should bring.  Please feel free to bring any additional tools you feel you may need)

  • ¼” light weight electric drill
  • Dremel tool with sanding drums
  • Clear safety glasses
  • Sponge and quart size water container (large butter tub is great)
  • Straight edge ruler
  • 16: x 20” piece of ¾” plywood with smooth side
  • Exacto knife with blades
  • Rawhide #4 Mallet (such as Tandy #3300-04)
  • Craft Tool Leather Shears (such as Tandy #3050-00)
  • Grooving tool (such as Tandy 8074-00)
  • Edging tool (such as Tandy #8077-03 or Osborne #127-4 preferred)
  • Craft tool Overstitcher #6 (such as Tandy 8079-06)
  • #14 Punch (such as Tandy 3777-14)
  • #9 Punch (such as Tandy 3777-9)
  • 12” x 12” Granite piece (minimum 1” thick)

Canceled – Hatmaking (Trinidad)

HAT MAKING with Tom Hirt

June 1-5, 2020

 $325 (extra charge for each hat)

To register call Donna Haddow at 719 846-5724.

Making a hat
Making a hat

Continuing Education only-not for college credit

PLEASE NOTE

FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER, THIS CLASS WILL BE HELD AT THE A.R. MITCHELL MUSEUM OF WESTERN ART, 150 E. MAIN STREET,  TRINIDAD, CO 81082

Students will learn to use the equipment and techniques to make a hat with products that most people have or can readily get from home.  Students will learn how to shape the hat by hand, ironing of the brim, sizing and hand cutting of the brim, hand pouncing and hand finishing the crown. If time allows, the class may touch on hat binding and trim by hand.  Students will leave class with a completed hat and the skills needed to practice what they learned at home and make additional hats with supplies they have on hand.  Tom will provide a hat box with all the tools and materials needed for each student.  This class has some down time while waiting for processes to complete.  To fill this time, students may bring a hat in need of repair and/or plan to make a second hat as time permits.

Tom Hirt is old-fashioned guy who does things the old fashioned way.  You might call him a throw-back to a bygone era-that time when h and cowboys and craftsmen took care of business with their hands.  Hirt continues that tradition to this day as a hat maker who makes superior-quality beaver felt hats one at a time by hand.  Known as the hat maker for the movies, he has designed hats for many famous clients including Val Kilmer, Sam Elliot, and Sharon Stone.  His credits include Tombstone, the Quick and the Dead, Conagher, and many others.  After almost 20 years, he is considered one of the West’s most notable and most established hatters.  Hats of the West or email Tom at info@tomhirt.com  719-372-9399

Students will need to register no later than May 8th in order for Tom to get the materials he will need for the class. Students should contact Tom at the number above to get a complete list of other supplies [at students expense] they need to bring and provide their hat size for ordering the block, etc.  Students will reimburse Tom for the cost of supplies and should contact him for pricing and to provide hat size information.

Three students with their completed hats